How to break up with booze this Dry July

How to break up with booze this Dry July

With Dry Julyers now in FULL swing, it's time to keep well this winter and ditch the booze for improved health. I mean heck, let's be real there's only so many zoom hangovers we can all endure.

To help us reach for the right stuff, Accredited nutritionist and Remedy Ambassador Jacqueline Alwill shares her advice for what to avoid and what to increase to support your sober stretch.

Booze isn't the only thing you should avoid...

While avoiding alcohol may be your main focus, look out for other dietary and lifestyle culprits that give you highs and lows too, as people often find themselves relying on one to reduce the effect of the other or eliminating one and replacing it for another.

Aim to reduce your intake of:

Alcohol – beware of liquor-infused chocolates or boozy custard. It's okay to be straight-up with everyone about having a breather from booze. When you do, more people look out for you and can give you a heads up when there's a food or drink that might have little nip of it. You never know who may come on board with you either!

Caffeine - During this period, it's helpful to try to reduce your intake of caffeine and set up some positive habits. You may find reducing caffeine actually isn't as difficult as it first seems when you're off the booze, too.  

A respite from alcohol will leave you feeling far more energised each day and less likely to want/need that coffee hit first thing after a night out. Reducing caffeine supports our health by reducing the load on our adrenals (responsible for releasing adrenaline and regulating our stress response) and the digestive system too — it's all a win! 

Alcohol, caffeine and refined sugars all have a similar effect on the brain's reward centre, stimulating the release of dopamine, also known as the feel-good hormone. While it might seem okay to have an extra cheeky sweet treat while abstaining from alcohol; this action can create a new habit or addictive behaviour that too can be hard to break in the long term. Aim to reduce refined sugars by temporarily avoiding items like cakes, pastries, chocolates, lollies, ice blocks, and sugar-sweetened beverages. The list goes on, but these are a great start!

Aim to increase intake of: 

So you've paired things back with booze, maybe with caffeine and sugars too. Now to support and replenish the body, so you're fighting fit for the year ahead. 

Water and herbal teas - Most of us can do with an increase in water intake. Water is one of the simplest ways to create change in our bodies because it energises our cells and supports the body's natural detoxification pathways.  

Immune and gut supportive beverages in place of inflammatory ones - Caffeine and alcohol can be considered disruptive not only to our adrenals, energy and hormonal balance but also to our gut. Stock up on fermented goodness to improve your gut health with live cultured beverages such as Remedy Kombucha, which don't contain any sugar thanks to their long aged fermentation process, but also aid digestion by balancing out bad bacteria with lots of all-natural good stuff, thanks to its live cultures, organic acids and antioxidants.

Vegetables and some fruit - Focus on increasing your vegetable intake including some starchy vegetables such as sweet potato, beetroot and pumpkin to sustain you. 

Fats work in many wonderous ways. Healthy fats (nuts seeds, avocado, olive oil, fatty fish such as salmon, trout and mackerel) offer essential nutrients to reduce inflammation in the cardiovascular system, improve cognition, to support the slow release of energy into our bodies by reducing the glycaemic load of our meals AND they improve satiety. If you've been eating heavy carbohydrate meals and wonder why you still feel hungry an hour later, it may be because the fat content necessary to keep you full just wasn't there.

Easter Bunny Bread by Jacqueline Alwill