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How to swap meat for veggies

Forget life-changing diets. Living a healthier and happier life can be achieved through baby steps: a little switch-a-roo here and a swap-a-roonie there. For example, with drinks it might be ditching a softie with your sushi and switching to a Remedy, or swapping some wine-time for a booch-break.

Same goes for food. One of the simplest changes you can make is one we've all heard before: eat more veggies. Easy said, but not always easily done, we get it. So we thought we'd share this handy guide from our Remedy Nutritionist, Jacqueline Alwill for upping your plant-based intake by swapping out meat for veggies. This post was originally published on Jacq's blog on her website The Brown Paper Bag. Pop over there for stacks of delicious recipes and advice on all things real healthy food and nutrition.


Over to you, Jacq!

Whether you’re a vegetarian or an avid meat eater, to be honest we can all do more eating of plants. However, it can be tricky if you’re not quite sure where to start right?

Here are a few ideas for making your old favourites (burgers, lasagne, stews, eggs and bacon) without sacrificing flavour and certainly no jibbing on the nutrition either – plants are abundant!

BURGERS

Because veggie burgers are insane and one of the yummiest way to get your fix without meat. Try:

    • Whole grilled field mushrooms
    • Chickpeas and sweet potato with herbs
    • Sliced haloumi – grilled, golden and stretchy mmmm
    • Lentils with herbs, brown rice and egg
    • Mixed grains – barley, brown rice, oat, peanut butter and herbs

 

LASAGNE

Family favourite right? Try:

    • Lentils for the mince in a 1:1 swap (cooked lentils to raw mince).
    • Grated veggies such as carrot, beetroot, parsnip and pumpkin, sauteed with herbs where mince was.
    • Sauteed mushroom and eggplant.

 

STEWS

Made for upping the veggie intake! Try using:

    • Chickpeas
    • Lentils
    • Kidney bean – lentil, kidney and black bean all work a treat in vegetarian chilli with guacamole.
    • Black bean.
    • Butter bean.

 

CURRIES

Spice up the ante… Try:

    • Combos of root vegetables such as pumpkin, sweet potato or carrot with nuts including almonds and cashews to create a sustaining curry with a good combo of fats.
    • Tempeh or organic tofu – you can now find soy free tempeh in lots of health food stores – I’ve come across Byron Bay Tempeh (tried the chickpea one) and their range is fab.
    • Bean combinations again – lentils, chickpeas, butter beans as above – but don’t forget the beautiful dhals you can make using moong dhal, yellow or red split peas too! There are a few dhal recipes on the Brown Paper Bag blog here.

 

BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ‘EXTRAS’

If that’s the right way to put it but let’s take a look at those. Try:

    • Bacon – order a side of sauteed spinach, avocado, spiced beans, grilled tomato, mushrooms and other such delicious plants, but try to just keep to your 1-2 slices of bread, we don’t need to put so much bread into our diet if we are moving to vegetarianism cheese – for sandwiches, wraps, etc – if you are moving toward a more vegan dietary approach – up the ante with sprouts such as alfalfa, mung and chickpea, and a good smear of avocado. #avomakeseverythingbetter
    • Creamy dressings – go for simple vinegar and oil based, or those made with coconut or natural yoghurt (if not vegan), avocado, nut butters and tahini make for delicious dressings too.

 

And a final word, if your intention is to move more toward vegetarianism but you still find yourself craving a steak, or lamb cutlets, don’t punish yourself and feel guilt, perhaps a flexible approach (flexitarian) is for you? Better to feel relaxed and content eating than anxious.

Images by Jacqueline Alwill for The Brown Paper Bag.

Roast Cherry Ripple Semifreddo

One of the perks of having the lovely Jacqueline Alwill from The Brown Paper Bag on board as our Remedy Nutritionist is an inside line to her AH-FREAKIN-MAZING whole food recipes.

We were obviously beyond excited when she was inspired by the launch of our new Cherry Plum kombucha to create a delicious, refined-sugar-free sweet treat that celebrates cherry in all its glory.

This recipe was originally posted on The Brown Paper Bag. Pop over there for stacks of delicious recipes and advice on all things real healthy food and nutrition. Over to you, Jacq...

"Remedy’s Cherry Plum Kombucha is deliciously sweet without being too much so, and on these hot summer days the perfect accompaniment for an icy treat – enter ROAST CHERRY RIPPLE SEMI FREDDO – enjoy!"

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Greek yoghurt
  • 1 cup ricotta
  • 1/2 cup full cream milk
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 180g cherries, seeded and halved

 

Method

  • Preheat oven to 180C and line a baking tray with greaseproof paper.
  • Place cherries on tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons honey and place in oven to cook for 30 minutes.
  • Once cherries are cooked, remove from oven and allow to cool.
  • Make the ice cream by placing greek yoghurt, ricotta, full cream milk, honey and vanilla in a large mixing bowl and whisk together well.
  • Pour half the ice cream into a 1L container, swirl through half the cherries and repeat.
  • Wrap with glad wrap and place in freezer to set over night.
  • Remove and allow to thaw slightly before serving.
  • To serve either flip out of tin and slice or scoop and serve with roast stone fruit.


Serves 6 - 8

Banner image by Jacqueline Alwill for The Brown Paper Bag.

Top five health benefits of native Kakadu plum

The term 'superfood' gets bandied about pretty liberally these days. We totally get it if your first inclination to any mention of superfood is the eye rolling emoji.

BUUUUUUT... we feel it is our duty to stand up for one little humble Aussie battler that is really truly madly deeply deserving of the term: the native Kakadu plum. It's no coincidence that this humble little fruit is one of the stars of our fancy-pants new flavour, Cherry Plum. 

Now, let's first establish that Kakadu plum probably doesn't fit what you imagine a plum to look like. For starters, it's green. Some say the it looks and tastes more like an English gooseberry. It tastes a little more tart, and it smells a bit like stewed apples and pears, with some citrusy, musky notes thrown in too.

So, why the superfood status? To get the lowdown on the health benefits of Kakadu plum, we had a yarn with Hayley Blieden, founder of Australian Superfood Co, who we work with to source our Kakadu plums. Hayley is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Nutritionist (BNutDiet, M.B.A.)  and she is super passionate about native foods and their nutritional benefits. Based on her wisdom, we've narrowed the health benefits down to a top five...

1. It's chockablock full of Vitamin C:

Kakadu plum contains the highest recorded levels of Vitamin C of any fruit in the WORLD. Seriously. We're talking 100 times the Vitamin C content found in an orange!

2. It's rich in antioxidants:

Kakadu plums are 5.2 times more potent than blueberries when it comes to antioxidants.

3. It's medicinal:

The world is finally waking up to what indigenous Australians have known forever, which is that the kakadu plum has antifungal and antiviral properties.

4. It packs vego-friendly muscle:

Kakadu plum is an excellent source of iron and Vitamin E, good news for our vego friends who are sick of being asked "but how do you get your iron?"

5. It's full of folate:

Kakadu plum contains 110 micrograms of folate per 100 gram – the same amount found in broccoli.

Pretty amazing list there, huh? If you're still sceptical, perhaps it would help to know that this ain't no fad. Hayley explains that Indigenous Australians have been all over Kakadu plum for a long, looooong time.

"Considered a gift of the Dreamtime, the Kakadu Plum has been an important food and medicine in Northern Australia for millennia" says Hayley.

"From March to June, the local people harvest and consume this energising, thirst-quenching fruit. Throughout the rest of the year, the tree sap is consumed to treat joint inflammation, whilst the bark is applied to the body to treat burns, rashes and infections."

If you're keen to know more, pop over to Australian Superfoods website here